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Roselyn House School / The RHISE Service

 

Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education and Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development Policy

 

This Policy refers to the Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) Curriculum including Relationships and Sex Education (RSE), Culture, Citizenship and Community (CCC) including British Values Curriculum, Enterprise and Employability Curriculum (E & E)  and Spiritual Moral Social and Cultural (SMSC) development across the whole school curriculum.

 

Aims and objectives:

At Roselyn House School and The RHISE Service, we teach Personal, Social and Health education (PSHE) and Culture, Citizenship and Community (CCC) lessons at Key Stage 2 & 3 and PSHE, Culture, Citizenship and Community (CCC) and Enterprise and Employability skills (NCFE) at Key Stage 4 & 5. This enables our students to become, independent and responsible members of society. We encourage our pupils to play a positive role in contributing to the life of the school and the wider community. In so doing we help develop their sense of self-worth. We teach them how society is organised and governed. We ensure that they experience the process of democracy in school through the school council. We teach them about rights and responsibilities. They learn to appreciate what it means to be a positive member of a diverse multicultural society. We aim for our students to become moral and employable members of society.

 

This policy should also be read in conjunction with the School’s, Safeguarding Policy, Online Safety Policy, Remote Learning Policy, Pathway to Adulthood Policy and SEAL and Wellbeing Policy.

 

It has been written with reference to Planning your relationships, sex and health curriculum, DfE 24th September 2020, updated February 2022 to include guidance on political impartiality in schools and follows the statutory curriculum guidance.

 

The aims of PSHE, CCC and Enterprise and Employability skills lessons are to:

 

  • Build on a sound PSHE Curriculum.

  • Understand what makes for good relationships with others.

  • Develop a greater understanding of other Cultures.

  • Improve understanding of the world around them.

  • Have respect for others; be tolerant.

  • Be independent and responsible members of the school community.

  • Develop self-confidence and self-esteem and make informed choices regarding personal and social issues.

  • Develop an open mind and acceptance of diversity.

  • See how as individual they can fit into society.

  • Develop positive employability skills.

  • Develop individuals who have a moral understanding.

  • Understand what it means to be a positive member of the community both in school and the wider community.

  • Broaden the future of a young person moving into adulthood.

  • Develop good relationships with other members of the school and the wider community.

  • Understand democracy and the need for rules and laws.

  • Promote fundamental British values.

  • Develop understanding and respect of the importance of equality and understanding differences (including religion, belief, or sexual orientation).

 

Promoting British Values

The Department for Education state that there is a need “to create and enforce a clear and rigorous expectation on all schools to promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.”

 

The government set out its definition of British values in the 2011 Prevent Strategy and these values were reiterated by the Prime Minister in 2014. At Roselyn House School these values are reinforced regularly.

 

Roselyn House School and The RHISE service recognises that protection from extremism and radicalisation is a vital element of safeguarding. Staff undertake annual training in this area and Mrs Rachel Smith is Designated Prevent Lead.

 

Democracy

Democracy is embedded at the school. Pupils are always listened to by adults and are taught to listen carefully and with concern to each other, respecting the right of every individual to have their opinions and voices heard. Pupils also can air their opinions and ideas through our school council and regular questionnaires. The elections of the school council members are based solely on pupil votes, reflecting our British electoral system, and demonstrating democracy in action.

 

The Rule of Law

The importance of laws whether they are those that govern the class, the school or the country, are consistently reinforced. We have whole school rules which are embedded in our work every day. Each class also discusses and sets its own rules that are clearly understood by all and seen to be necessary to ensure that every class member can learn in a safe and ordered environment. Our pupils are taught the value and reasons behind laws, that they govern and protect us, the responsibilities that this involves and the consequences when laws are broken. Individual Liberty Within school, pupils are actively encouraged to make choices, knowing that they are in a safe and supportive environment. As a school we educate and provide boundaries for our pupils to make choices safely, through the provision of a safe environment (physically and online) and an empowering education. Our pupils are encouraged to know, understand, and exercise their rights and personal freedoms and are advised how to exercise these safely; examples of this can be clearly seen in CCC, PSHE, target setting workshops and SEAL Lessons. Whether it is through choice of challenge; of how they record; of participation in our extra-curricular activities; our pupils are given the freedom to make choices.  

 

Mutual Respect

Respect is one of the core values of our school. Pupils know and understand that it is expected and imperative that respect is shown to everyone, whatever differences we may have and to everything, however big or small. The core value of Respect at Roselyn House School and The RHISE Service underpins our work every day both in and out of the classroom and online.

 

Tolerance of Those with Different Faiths and Beliefs

Our core value of Respect ensures tolerance of those who have different faiths and beliefs. Our school enhances pupils understanding of different faiths and beliefs through P.S.H.E. and CCC lessons and across the curriculum; participation in celebrations from differing faiths; welcoming visitors from many differing faith groups and enjoying a depth of study during themed weeks. Beliefs, traditions, and customs are studied in depth, with visitors being invited into our school to enrich and extend understanding. Through this our pupils gain an enhanced understanding of their place in a culturally diverse society.

 

Protected Characteristics

The Public Sector Equality Duty (as set out in section 149 of the Equality Act 2010) requires all public authorities (including state-funded schools) in the exercise of their function, to have due regard to the need to:

  • Eliminate discrimination, harassment, victimisation, and any other conduct that is prohibited by or under the Equality Act.

  • Advance equality of opportunity between persons who share a relevant protected characteristic and persons who do not share it.

  • Foster good relations between persons who share a relevant protected characteristic and persons who do not share it.

 

Relevant protected characteristics are:

  • age

  • disability

  • gender reassignment

  • pregnancy and maternity

  • race

  • religion or belief

  • sex and sexual orientation

 

Pupils should leave school with a proper understanding of the importance of equality and respecting and understanding differences. This includes differences in religion, belief or sexual orientation.  The school curriculum (whereby sexual relationships/PSHE/SEAL is delivered) will include relevant information around the risks associated with Child Sexual Exploitation.

 

Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation

We at Roselyn House acknowledge that topics involving gender and biological sex can be complex and sensitive matters to navigate and therefore strive to not reinforce harmful stereotypes. 

 

All pupils should receive teaching on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) relationships during their school years.  Secondary schools should include LGBT content in their teaching.  Primary schools are strongly encouraged, and enabled, when teaching about different types of family, to include families with same sex parents.

 

Stonewall Silver Award School Champions

Roselyn House school are proud to have achieved the stonewall silver award and are working towards gold award.  To achieve the awards staff and pupils must demonstrate the following criteria:

  • Pupils have age-appropriate lessons on different families, including LGBT families.

  • Pupils have age-appropriate lessons on celebrating difference, gender identity and gender stereotypes.

  • Pupils have had opportunities to discuss gender stereotypes.

  • Pupils learn about LGBT people.

  • Pupils have had multiple chances to discuss gender stereotypes.

  • The school holds events to celebrate equality and diversity such as: LGBT History Month, International Women’s Day or International Day of Non-Binary Visibility.

  • Different families, celebrating difference and gender diversity are embedded across the curriculum

  • RSE is inclusive of different types of relationships – including LGBT relationships - and gender identities.

  •  

Teaching and learning styles

We use a range of teaching and learning styles which clearly explain the knowledge, facts and concepts needed and pupils are provided with opportunities to recall the acquired knowledge, facts, and concepts to develop their understanding of topics. We place an emphasis on active learning by including students in discussions, investigations, and problem-solving activities. We encourage the students to take part in a range of practical activities that promote active citizenship, e.g. charity fundraising, the planning of school special events such as an assembly or open evening, or involvement in an activity to help other individuals or groups less fortunate than themselves. We organise classes in such a way that pupils can participate in discussion to resolve conflicts or set agreed classroom rules of behaviour. We offer children the opportunity to hear visiting speakers, such as health workers, police, and representatives from the local church, whom we invite into the school to talk about their role in creating a positive and supportive local community.    

 

Lessons are delivered in a non-judgemental factual way and allow scope for young people to ask questions in a safe environment.  All materials used align with the teaching requirements set out in statutory guidance. 

 

Effective Online Safety education is embedded across the curriculum, including PSHE.  It is important that Teachers identify and reference ways that online aspects of Safeguarding can be reinforced in their respective lesson planning and delivery. This follows our school’s Online Safety Policy which is also shared with Parents/Carers.

 

Roselyn House is a trauma sensitive school therefore emphasis is placed on developing a sensitive teaching style to ensure all pupils feel safe and supported in lessons and able to engage with key messages.  Teachers always seek to treat individual pupils with sympathy and support.

 

A pupil centred, whole school approach is taken with these subjects (PSHE, CCC and Enterprise and Employability skills) to support pupils to be safe, happy, and prepared for life beyond school. 

 

In the event of school closure or individual student isolation, remote learning will take place.  Remote learning will be reflected in schemes of work and lessons will be adapted to ensure that the curriculum remains fully accessible via remote learning, where practical. See Remote Learning Policy.

 

During periods of remote learning the school will maintain regular contact with parents/carers to reinforce the importance of staying safe online. Encouraging them to set age-appropriate parental controls on devices and internet filters to block malicious websites and direct parents to useful resources to help them keep their children safe online. 

 

 

PSHE and curriculum planning

There is dedicated timetabled time for PSHE, CCC and E & E lessons to take place. Some of the time we introduce aspects of each course through other subjects, e.g. when teaching about local environmental issues in geography.

 

As there is a large overlap between the programme of study for religious education and the aims of PSHE and citizenship, we teach a considerable amount of religious education through our CCC lessons.

 

We also develop PSHE and citizenship through activities and whole-school events, e.g. the school council representatives from each class meet regularly to discuss matters.

 

Our teaching in PSHE and CCC matches the aim of developing a child’s personal, emotional and social development as set out in their Learning Support Plans and IEBP and compliments our SEAL programme.

 

At our school we teach PSHE and CCC to all students in Key Stage 2 & 3 and in Key Stage 4 & 5, PSHE, CCC and E & E, whatever their ability. PSHE, CCC and E & E forms part of the school curriculum policy to provide a broad and balanced education to all students. Through our PSHE and CCC teaching we provide learning opportunities that enable all pupils to make progress. We do this by setting suitable learning challenges and responding to each child’s different needs. We enable pupils to have access to the full range of activities involved in learning PSHE and CCC. Where children are to participate in activities outside the classroom (including remote learning, we carry out a risk assessment prior to the activity, to ensure that the activity is safe and appropriate for all pupils.  Roselyn House School/The RHISE service take all reasonable precautions to ensure that users access only appropriate material.  However due to the international scale and linked nature of internet content, it is not possible to guarantee that unsuitable material will never appear on a school computer.  Roselyn House School and The RHISE Service cannot accept liability for the material accessed, or any consequences of internet access that is beyond the school’s current filtering system.

 

Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, online learning has increased in its usage and become a part of the Roselyn House School and The RHISE Service’s Curriculum along with everyday use in school. Online safety is integrated into the curriculum for PSHE, CCC and Enterprise and Employability skills, pupils are supported to look at issues within online safety including ‘The 3 Cs Risk Matrix’ outlined in the Online Safety Policy.   

 

Links

Roselyn House School and the RHISE Service are linked with Hope Flowers School and are members of The BIG Classroom.

 

Hope Flowers School, Bethlehem

Roselyn House and Hope Flowers are now linked schools and work on projects with our young people where they communicate with each other and take part in joint activities. This is very exciting for all students and helps them to feel a sense of self, understanding of others in the World and helps towards bridging a divide of our future generations; whilst fostering mutually beneficial and respectful friendships within those that don’t always feel that they can trust or be cared for.

 

We also share practice with Teachers and therapists in order to provide resources, ideas, suggestions and soundbites in attachment awareness and SEN Teaching methods. We have secured the help of translators for this too.

 

This is a great opportunity for both our schools and likeminded individuals, who through differing circumstances have the same passion and drive to improve the lives of future generations. It is our hope as an outcome of this project that we can raise awareness of the lack of Mental Health support in the UK and increase support/ acknowledgment of the work done at Hope Flowers, bringing young people together to break down barriers and encourage diversity, acceptance and positive communication. This allows our young people to become ethically aware and care about the well-being of others which in itself improves self-worth, dignity and confidence. It provides our young people with a belief in the future and gives them hope. 

 

The BIG Classroom

The BIG Classroom is an online community of thousands of schools across the UK who are dedicated to promoting tolerance and challenging stereotypes by giving a snapshot of their day to day lives at work, rest and play.

 

How does it work?

Each class has its own profile and blog page to upload photos and videos, giving a snapshot of themselves and their community at work, rest, play and worship.

Every half term we will be linked with 4 – 6 other schools chosen because they are contrasting in terms of culture, faith, ethnicity, community or location.

 

At regular intervals each class views their linked schools' updates, discuss what they see and can message the schools with questions to learn more about other communities.

 

Classes can make contact with their linked schools to arrange joint projects, such as email or traditional pen pals, video blogs, related topic work etc.

 

Our blog content will provide unequivocal evidence to demonstrate how our students' cultural awareness is being improved.

 

Each group can keep the same profile page throughout their school life and choose to remain linked with schools they enjoy working with. By the end of a full school career students will have made dozens of links throughout the UK, forging lasting relationships with students from cultures they would not otherwise encounter.

 

All of this takes place in a safe, secure and controlled online environment. Students can be educated in a real yet safe environment about the dangers and benefits of social networking and internet safety in general.

 

The BIG classroom targets key issues raised in OFSTED's school inspection handbook which will have an impact on a school's rating, particularly for promoting British values and implementing the Prevent strategy.

 

Assessment and recording

Teachers assess the children’s work in PSHE and citizenship both by making informal judgements as they observe them during lessons and by doing formal assessments of their work, measured against the objectives set. Students are assessed using Roselyn House School’s 1-4 progress and attitude to learning Levelling Assessment. We have clear expectations of what the pupils will know, understand and be able to do at the end of each key stage and each topic. Teachers record the achievements of pupils in PSHE and citizenship in their mark books. We report these achievements to parents at the end of each term.

Students complete UAS Units of accreditation.

 

Monitoring and review

The PSHE and CCC subject leader is responsible for monitoring the standards of children’s work and the quality of teaching. The subject leader supports colleagues in the teaching of PSHE and CCC by giving them information about current developments in the subject and by providing a strategic lead and direction for the subject in the school.

  • Aspects of health and sex relationship education are included in the science programmes of study and physical education programme of study.

  • Aspects of citizenship education are included in the history and geography programmes of study and syllabuses at Key Stage 2 & 3.

  • In all national curriculum subjects, teachers are required to make effective Provision for all pupils.

  • Aspects of behavioural and discipline management are required by Section 154 of the 1996 Education Act.

  • Education Act 2002. All schools must provide a broad and balanced curriculum which:

  • Promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental, and physical development of pupils.

  • Prepares pupils at the school for the opportunities, responsibilities, and experiences of later life.

  1. Equality Act 2010.  Schools are free to include a full range of issues, ideas, and materials in their curriculum.  Schools are not required to equally weight all the protected characteristics within the curriculum

 

Relationship and Sex Education forms part of PSHE and Science curriculums. It is a statutory duty for schools to teach the subject matter and we follow guidance from DfE’s Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education Statutory guidance for governing bodies,  proprietors, head teachers, principals, senior leadership teams, teacher 2019.

 

Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education guidance (publishing.service.gov.uk)

 

Right to request withdrawal

Parents and carers have the right to request withdrawal from all or part of sex education. 

 

If parents or carers would like to make a request for withdrawal, they should contact Miss Damerall, the Headteacher via letter or email. 

 

Once a request is received correspondence will be made with parents and carers to:

 

  1. discuss the background to their request

  2. offer assurances about your school’s approach

  3. set out the benefits of pupils accessing sex education in school

 

If invitation to a discussion is declined, the request for withdrawal will still be the process in line with normal procedures. 

 

If parents or carers still want withdrawal after such a discussion, unless there are exceptional circumstances, parents and carers’ request should be granted until 3 terms before the pupil turns 16. For example, if the pupil’s 16th birthday is in February of year 11, that point would be February in year 10.

 

At that point, if the pupil wishes to be taught sex education, you must ensure they receive it in one of those 3 terms and continue to be taught it while the child remains in school.

A record of all discussions with parents, carers and pupils concerning the right to withdraw, exceptions and decisions not to grant it will be kept and where possible shared with parents and carers to make sure all parties are clear about the decisions. 

 

Parents and carers cannot withdraw their child from:

 

  • Relationships education

  • Health education

  • National curriculum science

 

Relationships education, relationships and sex education (RSE) and health education: FAQs - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

 

KS2:

PSHE:

  • Identity (their personal qualities, attitudes, skills, attributes and achievements and what influences these)

  • Relationships (including different types and in different settings)

  • A healthy (including physically, emotionally, and socially) balanced lifestyle (including within relationships, work-life, exercise, and rest, spending, and saving and diet)

  • Risk (identification, assessment and how to manage risk rather than simply the avoidance of risk for self and others) and physical, emotional, and online safety (including behaviour and strategies to employ in different settings)

  • Diversity and equality (in all its forms)

  • Rights (including the notion of universal human rights), responsibilities (including fairness and justice) and consent (in different contexts)

  • Change (as something to be managed) and resilience (the skills, strategies and ‘inner resources’ we can draw on when faced with challenging change or circumstance)

  • Power (how it is used and encountered in a variety of contexts including persuasion, bullying, negotiation and ‘win-win’ outcomes)

  • Career (including enterprise, employability, and economic understanding)

  • what is meant by a healthy lifestyle?

  • how to maintain physical, mental, and emotional health and wellbeing

  • how to manage risks to physical and emotional health and wellbeing

  • ways of keeping physically and emotionally safe (including online safety)

  • about managing change, including puberty, transition, and loss

  • how to make informed choices about health and wellbeing and to recognise sources of help with this

  • how to respond in an emergency

  • to identify different influences on health and wellbeing

 

Programme of Study for Relationships Pupils should be taught:

  • how to develop and maintain a variety of healthy relationships, within a range of social/cultural contexts

  • how to recognise and manage emotions within a range of relationships

  • how to recognise risky or negative relationships including all forms of bullying and abuse

  • how to respond to risky or negative relationships and ask for help

  • how to respect equality and diversity in relationships.

  • about respect for self and others and the importance of responsible behaviours and actions

  • about rights and responsibilities as members of families, other groups and ultimately as citizens

  • about different groups and communities

  • to respect equality and to be a productive member of a diverse community

  • about the importance of respecting and protecting the environment

  • about where money comes from, keeping it safe and the importance of managing it effectively

  • how money plays an important part in people’s lives and a basic understanding of enterprise.

 

Citizenship and Community

Developing confidence and responsibility and making the most of their abilities Pupils should be taught:

  • to talk and write about their opinions, and explain their views, on issues that affect themselves and society.

  • to recognise their worth as individuals by identifying positive things about themselves and their achievements, seeing their mistakes, making amends, and setting personal goals.

  • to face new challenges positively by collecting information, looking for help, making responsible choices, and acting.

  • to recognise, as they approach puberty, how people's emotions change at that time and how to deal with their feelings towards themselves, their family, and others in a positive way.

  • about the range of jobs carried out by people they know, and to understand how they can develop skills to make their own contribution in the future.

  • to look after their money and realise that future wants, and needs may be met through saving.

 

Preparing to play an active role as citizens Pupils should be taught:

  • to research, discuss and debate topical issues, problems, and events.

  • why and how rules and laws are made and enforced, why different rules are needed in different situations and how to take part in making and changing rules.

  • to realise the consequences of anti-social and aggressive behaviours, such as bullying and racism, on individuals and communities.

  • that there are different kinds of responsibilities, rights, and duties at home, at school and in the community, and that these can sometimes conflict with each other.

  • to reflect on spiritual, moral, social, and cultural issues, using imagination to understand other people's experiences.

  • to resolve differences by looking at alternatives, making decisions and explaining choices.

  • what democracy is, and about the basic institutions that support it locally and nationally.

  • to recognise the role of voluntary, community and pressure groups.

  • to appreciate the range of national, regional, religious, and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom.

  • that resources can be allocated in different ways and that these economic choices affect individuals, communities, and the sustainability of the environment.

  • to explore how the media present information.

 

Developing a healthy, safer lifestyle

Pupils should be taught:

  • what makes a healthy lifestyle, including the benefits of exercise and healthy eating, what affects mental health, and how to make informed choices.

  • that bacteria and viruses can affect health and that following simple, safe routines can reduce their spread.

  • about how the body changes as they approach puberty.

  • which commonly available substances and drugs are legal and illegal, their effects and risks

  • to recognise the different risks in different situations and then decide how to behave responsibly, including online safety, sensible road use, and judging what kind of physical contact is acceptable or unacceptable.

  • that pressure to behave in an unacceptable or risky way can come from a variety of sources, including people they know, and how to ask for help and use basic techniques for resisting pressure to do wrong; (including online safety)

  • school rules about health and safety, basic emergency aid procedures and where to get help.

 

Developing good relationships and respecting the differences between people

Pupils should be taught:

  • that their actions affect themselves and others, to care about other people's feelings and to try to see things from their points of view.

  • to think about the lives of people living in other places and times, and people with different values and customs.

  • to be aware of different types of relationship, including marriage and those between friends and families, and to develop the skills to be effective in relationships.

  • to realise the nature and consequences of racism, teasing, bullying and aggressive behaviours, and how to respond to them and ask for help.

  • to recognise and challenge stereotypes.

  • that differences and similarities between people arise from several factors, including cultural, ethnic, racial, and religious diversity, gender and disability.

  • where individuals, families and groups can get help and support. Breadth of opportunities

 

During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through opportunities to:

  • take responsibility (for example, for planning and looking after the school environment; for the needs of others, such as by acting as a peer supporter, as a befriender, or as a playground mediator for younger pupils; for looking after animals properly; for identifying safe, healthy and sustainable means of travel when planning their journey to school);

  • feel positive about themselves (for example, by producing personal diaries, profiles, and portfolios of achievements; by having opportunities to show what they can do and how much responsibility they can take).

  • participate (for example, in the school's decision-making process, relating it to democratic structures and processes such as councils, parliaments, government and voting).

  • make real choices and decisions (for example, about issues affecting their health and wellbeing such as smoking; on the use of scarce resources; how to spend money, including pocket money and contributions to charities).

  • meet and talk with people (for example, people who contribute to society through environmental pressure groups or international aid organisations; people who work in the school and the neighbourhood, such as religious leaders, community police officers);

  • develop relationships through work and play (for example, taking part in activities with groups that have needs, such as children with special needs and the elderly, communicating with children in other countries by satellite, email, or letters).

  • consider social and moral dilemmas that they come across in life (for example, encouraging respect and understanding between different races and dealing with harassment).

  • find information and advice (for example, through helplines; by understanding about welfare systems in society).

  • prepare for change (for example, transferring to secondary school.)

 

Culture

 

  • Christianity

  • Hinduism

  • Islam

  • Judaism

  • Sikhism

  • Morals and Ethics

 

KS3

PSHE

 

  1. how to manage transition

  2. how to maintain physical, mental, and emotional health and wellbeing including sexual health*

  3. about parenthood and the consequences of teenage pregnancy

  4. how to assess and manage risks to health and to stay, and keep others, safe (physical, emotional, and online)

  5. how to identify and access help, advice, and support how to make informed choices about health and wellbeing matters including drugs, alcohol, and tobacco; maintaining a balanced diet; physical activity; emotional health and wellbeing and sexual health

  6. how to respond in an emergency including administering first aid

  7. the role and influence of the media on lifestyle.

Programme of Study for relationships

Pupils should be taught:

 

  • how to develop and maintain a variety of healthy relationships within a range of social/cultural contexts and to develop parenting skills

  • how to recognise and manage emotions within a range of relationships

  • how to deal with risky or negative relationships including all forms of bullying (including the distinct challenges posed by online bullying) and abuse, sexual and other violence, and online encounters

  • about the concept of consent in a variety of contexts (including in sexual relationships)

  • about managing loss including bereavement, separation, and divorce

  • to respect equality and be a productive member of a diverse community

  • how to identify and access appropriate advice and support

Pupils should be taught:

  • about rights and responsibilities as members of diverse communities, as active citizens, and participants in the local and national economy

  • how to make informed choices and be enterprising and ambitious

  • how to develop employability, team working and leadership skills and develop flexibility and resilience

  • about the economic and business environment

  • how personal financial choices can affect oneself and others and about rights and responsibilities as consumers

 

Citizenship and community

  1. Teaching should develop pupils’ understanding of democracy, government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Pupils should use and apply their knowledge and understanding whilst developing skills to research and interrogate evidence, debate, and evaluate viewpoints, present reasoned arguments and take informed action. Pupils should be taught about:

  2. the development of the political system of democratic government in the United Kingdom, including the roles of citizens, Parliament, and the monarch

  3. the operation of Parliament, including voting and elections, and the role of political parties

  4. the precious liberties enjoyed by the citizens of the United Kingdom

  5. the nature of rules and laws and the justice system, including the role of the police and the operation of courts and tribunals

  6.  the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities, including opportunities to participate in school-based activities

  7. the functions and uses of money, the importance and practice of budgeting, and managing risk.

 

Culture

  1. Beliefs

  2. Global issues

  3. Practices and belonging

  4. Relationship and lifestyle

  5. Ethics

  6. Media

  7. Science and religion

 

 

 

 

Coverage of the curriculum KS3

 

Fake News and critical thinking

Multiculturalism

No Deal Brexit

Politics and UK Government

Refugees, Migration Human Rights

Religion and Community Cohesion

Religious tolerance

Trade Unions

Unicef and United Nations

Volunteering

Women’s Rights

 

 

Coverage of the curriculum KS3 PSHE

PHYSICAL HEALTH AND MENTAL WELLBEING

Curriculum objective

Where it is covered in the Your Choice series

Mental wellbeing

Pupils should know

  • how to talk about their emotions accurately and sensitively, using appropriate vocabulary.

Book One

3.1 Feeling worried or anxious

10.1 State management

15.1 Managing your emotions

15.2 Managing grief

15.3 Dealing with divorce or parents splitting up

Book Two

11.1 Dealing with anger

11.2 Jealousy

11.3 Dealing with fear

12.1 Signs of stress

12.3 Coping with stress

Book Three

1.1 Building your confidence

1.2 Self-esteem

1.3 Coping with challenges and change

1.4 Problem-solving

  • that happiness is linked to being connected to others.

Book One

5.1 You and your family

15.1 Managing your emotions

17.1 How you spend your time

19.1 Being a good neighbour

Book Three

8.1 Different types of partnership

8.2 What makes relationships work?

13.1 Attending to your wellbeing

13.4 Getting help and giving help

  • how to recognise the early signs of mental wellbeing concerns.

Book One

3.1 Feeling worried or anxious

Book Two

12.1 Signs of stress

12.2 What stresses you?

12.3 Coping with stress

Book Three

10.1 Eating disorders

13.1 Attending to your wellbeing

13.2 Mindfulness

13.3 Mental illness

13.4 Getting help and giving help

  • common types of mental ill health (e.g. anxiety and depression).

Book Two

12.1 Signs of stress

12.2 What stresses you?

12.3 Coping with stress

Book Three

10.1 Eating disorders

13.3 Mental illness

13.5 Managing anxiety

13.6 Managing depression

  • how to critically evaluate when something they do or are involved in has a positive or negative effect on their own or others’ mental health.

Book One

4.3 Regrets and saying sorry

5.1 You and your family

5.2 What makes a good friend?

5.3 Rivalries

8.1 What is bullying?

8.2 Dealing with bullies

9.2 Cyberbullying

Book Two

1.1 Becoming an adult

1.2 Problems with parents

1.3 Being responsible

2.1 Close relationships

2.2 What makes a healthy relationship?

2.3 Unhealthy relationships and feelings of rejection

Book Three

1.1 Building your confidence

1.2 Self-esteem

1.3 Coping with challenges and change

1.4 Problem-solving

13.4 Getting help and giving help

  • the benefits and importance of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation and voluntary and service-based activities on mental wellbeing and happiness.

 

Book One

14.1 Exercise

14.2 Exercise, sleep and your mental health

15.1 Managing your emotions

17.1 How you spend your time

19.1 Being a good neighbour

Book Two

12.3 Coping with stress

Book Three

13.1 Attending to your wellbeing

Internet safety and harms

Pupils should know

  • the similarities and differences between the online world and the physical world, including: the impact of unhealthy or obsessive comparison with others online (including through setting unrealistic expectations for body image), how people may curate a specific image of their life online, over-reliance on online relationships including social media, the risks related to online gambling including the accumulation of debt, how advertising and information is targeted at them and how to be a discerning consumer of information online.

Book One

3.2 The laws of attraction

4.2 Who do you admire?

9.1 Personal safety online

17.2 Internet gaming addiction

Book Two

7.4 Are you addicted to your mobile phone?

Book Three

5.2 Your online reputation

9.1 Social media and body image

12.3 Online literacy and responsibility

14.1 What is gambling?

14.2 Problem gambling

14.3 How to manage gambling

  • how to identify harmful behaviours online (including bullying, abuse or harassment) and how to report, or find support, if they have been affected by those behaviours.

Book One

9.1 Personal safety online

9.2 Cyberbullying

9.3 Protecting your identity online

Book Two

5.1 Child abuse

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

5.2 Your online reputation

12.1 Fake news

12.2 Radicalisation

12.3 Online literacy and responsibility

Physical health and fitness

Pupils should know

  • the positive associations between physical activity and promotion of mental wellbeing, including as an approach to combat stress.

Book One

14.1 Exercise

14.2 Exercise, sleep and your mental health

17.1 How you spend your time

Book Two

12.1 Signs of stress

12.2 What stresses you?

12.3 Coping with stress

Book Three

13.1 Attending to your wellbeing

13.2 Mindfulness

13.4 Getting help and giving help

  • the characteristics and evidence of what constitutes a healthy lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight, including the links between an inactive lifestyle and ill health, including cancer and cardio-vascular ill-health.

Book One

13.1 Healthy eating

13.2 You and your weight

14.1 Exercise

14.2 Exercise, sleep and your mental health

Book Three

10.1 Eating disorders

  • about the science relating to blood, organ and stem cell donation.

Book Two

15.4 Blood, organ and stem cell donation

Healthy eating

Pupils should know

  • how to maintain healthy eating and the links between a poor diet and health risks, including tooth decay and cancer.

Book One

13.1 Healthy eating

13.2 You and your weight

Book Two

10.2 Caring for your teeth, ears and eyes

Book Three

10.1 Eating disorders

Drugs, alcohol and tobacco

Pupils should know

  • the facts about legal and illegal drugs and their associated risks, including the link between drug use, and the associated risks, including the link to serious mental health conditions.

Book One

12.1 What are drugs?

12.2 What effects do drugs have?

Book Two

7.1 Recreational drugs

7.2 New psychoactive substances

7.3 How can I tell if a drug is safe?

Book Three

6.1 Heroin and cocaine

6.2 The impact of drugs

  • the law relating to the supply and possession of illegal substances.

Book One

12.1 What are drugs?

12.2 What effects do drugs have?

Book Two

7.2 New psychoactive substances

Book Three

6.1 Heroin and cocaine

6.2 The impact of drugs

  • the physical and psychological risks associated with alcohol consumption and what constitutes low risk alcohol consumption in adulthood.

Book Two

8.1 Alcohol: the facts

8.2 Alcohol: the risks

8.3 Alcoholism

Book Three

5.1 Safety at parties

  • the physical and psychological consequences of addiction, including alcohol dependency.

Book Two

8.2 Alcohol: the risks

8.3 Alcoholism

  • awareness of the dangers of drugs which are prescribed but still present serious health risks.

Book Two

7.3 How can I tell if a drug is safe?

  • the facts about the harms from smoking tobacco (particularly the link to lung cancer), the benefits of quitting and how to access support to do so.

Book One

11.1 Smoking facts

11.2 Smoking versus vaping

Health and prevention

Pupils should know

  • about personal hygiene, germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread, treatment and prevention of infection, and about antibiotics.

Book Two

9.1 Immunisations and health checks

10.1 Looking after your skin

  • about dental health and the benefits of good oral hygiene and dental flossing, including healthy eating and regular check-ups at the dentist.

Book Two

10.2 Caring for your teeth, ears and eyes

  • (late secondary) the benefits of regular self-examination and screening.

Book Two

4.1 STIs

4.2 Symptoms of STIs

4.3 Sexual health clinics

9.1 Immunisations and health checks

  • the facts and science relating to immunisation and vaccination.

Book Two

9.1 Immunisations and health checks

Book Three

12.1 Fake news

  • the importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and how a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.

Book One

14.2 Exercise, sleep and your mental health

Book Two

12.1 Signs of stress

12.3 Coping with stress

Book Three

13.1 Attending to your wellbeing

Basic first aid

Pupils should know

  • basic treatment for common injuries.

Book One

20.1 First aid: what to do in an emergency

  • life-saving skills, including how to administer CPR.

We think these skills are better taught by an expert in person than through a textbook. In the Teacher Guide we have provided links to training providers and online guidance.

  • the purpose of defibrillators and when one might be needed.

Changing adolescent body

Pupils should know

  • key facts about puberty, the changing adolescent body and menstrual wellbeing.

Book One

2.1 Puberty

2.2 Periods: the facts

Book Three

2.3 Understanding gender identity

 

  • the main changes which take place in males and females, and the implications for emotional and physical health.

Book One

2.1 Puberty

2.2 Periods: the facts

7.1 Exploring your sexuality

Book Two

1.1 Becoming an adult

1.2 Problems with parents

1.3 Being responsible

Book Three

2.3 Understanding gender identity

Additional

This should enable pupils to understand how their bodies are changing, how they are feeling and why, to further develop the language that they use to talk about their bodies, health and emotions

Book One

2.1 Puberty

Book Two

1.1 Becoming an adult

 

 

 

RELATIONSHIPS AND SEX EDUCATION

Curriculum objective

Where it is covered in the Your Choice series

Families

Pupils should know

  • that there are different types of committed, stable relationships.

Book One

5.1 You and your family

Book Three

8.1 Different types of partnership

8.2 What makes relationships work?

  • how these relationships might contribute to human happiness and their importance for bringing up children.

Book Three

7.4 Good parenting

8.2 What makes relationships work?

  • what marriage is, including their legal status, e.g. that marriage carries legal rights and protections not available to couples who are cohabiting or who have married, for example, in an unregistered religious ceremony.

Book Three

8.1 Different types of partnership

 

  • why marriage is an important relationship choice for many couples and why it must be freely entered into.

Book Three

3.3 Forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM

8.1 Different types of partnership

8.2 What makes relationships work?

  • the characteristics and legal status of other types of long-term relationships.

Book Three

8.1 Different types of partnership

  • the roles and responsibilities of parents with respect to raising of children, including the characteristics of successful parenting.

Book Three

7.3 Teenage parents

7.4 Good parenting

  • how to: determine whether other children, adults or sources of information are trustworthy: judge when a family, friend, intimate or other relationship is unsafe (and to recognise this in others’ relationships); and, how to seek help or advice, including reporting concerns about others, if needed.

Book One

4.2 Who do you admire?

5.1 You and your family

5.2 What makes a good friend?

8.1 What is bullying?

8.2 Dealing with bullies

9.1 Personal safety online

9.2 Cyberbullying

Book Two

2.1 Close relationships

2.2 What makes a healthy relationship?

2.3 Unhealthy relationships and feelings of rejection

5.1 Child abuse

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

3.2 Violence against women

3.3 Forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM

12.2 Radicalisation

Respectful relationships, including friendships

Pupils should know

  • the characteristics of positive and healthy friendships (in all contexts, including online) including: trust, respect, honesty, kindness, generosity, boundaries, privacy, consent and the management of conflict, reconciliation and ending relationships. This includes different (non-sexual) types of relationship.

Book One

1.2 Your personality

4.1 Right and wrong

4.2 Who do you admire?

4.3 Regrets and saying sorry

5.2 What makes a good friend?

7.1 Exploring your sexuality

7.2 Sex: your rights and responsibilities

7.3 Attitudes to sex

10.2 What influences your decisions

Book Two

2.1 Close relationships

2.2 What makes a healthy relationship?

2.3 Unhealthy relationships and feelings of rejection

3.1 Giving your consent

5.1 Child abuse

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

8.1 Different types of partnership

8.2 What makes relationships work?

  • practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships.

Book One

4.3 Regrets and saying sorry

5.2 What makes a good friend?

Book Two

2.1 Close relationships

2.2 What makes a healthy relationship?

2.3 Unhealthy relationships and feelings of rejection

3.1 Giving your consent

Book Three

8.2 What makes relationships work?

  • how stereotypes, in particular stereotypes based on sex, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation or disability, can cause damage (e.g. how they might normalise non-consensual behaviour or encourage prejudice).

Book One

1.4 Gender and your identity

Book Two

6.1 What is stereotyping?

6.2 What is prejudice?

16.1 Disabilities and learning differences

16.2 Dealing with ageism

Book Three

3.1 Women’s rights

3.2 Violence against women

3.4 LGBT+ rights

4.1 Racism in education and at work

4.2 Racism and society

12.2 Radicalisation

  • that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including people in positions of authority and due tolerance of other people’s beliefs.

Book One

1.1 Your identity

1.3 Who am I?

1.4 Gender and your identity

4.3 Regrets and saying sorry

7.1 Exploring your sexuality

8.1 What is bullying?

8.2 Dealing with bullies

Book Two

6.1 What is stereotyping?

6.2 What is prejudice?

14.1 Laws and the rights of children

14.2 You and the police

15.2 You and human rights

16.1 Disabilities and learning differences

16.2 Dealing with ageism

Book Three

2.1 Your developing sexuality

2.2 What influences your attitudes to sexuality and gender?

3.1 Women’s rights

3.2 Violence against women

3.4 LGBT+ rights

4.1 Racism in education and at work

4.2 Racism and society

  • about different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders to report bullying and how and where to get help.

Book One

7.1 Exploring your sexuality

8.1 What is bullying?

8.2 Dealing with bullies

9.2 Cyberbullying

Book Three

3.4 LGBT+ rights

  • that some types of behaviour within relationships are criminal, including violent behaviour and coercive control.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

7.2 Sex: your rights and responsibilities

Book Two

2.3 Unhealthy relationships and feelings of rejection

3.1 Giving your consent

5.1 Child abuse

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting - it's no laughing matter

Book Three

3.2 Violence against women

3.3 Forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM

  • what constitutes sexual harassment and sexual violence and why these are always unacceptable.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

7.2 Sex: your rights and responsibilities

Book Two

3.1 Giving your consent

5.1 Child abuse

Book Three

3.1 Women’s rights

3.2 Violence against women

3.3 Forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM

3.4 LGBT+ rights

  • the legal rights and responsibilities regarding equality (particularly with reference to the protected characteristics as defined in the Equality Act 2010) and that everyone is unique and equal.

Book One

7.1 Exploring your sexuality

7.2 Sex: your rights and responsibilities

Book Two

6.2 What is prejudice?

16.1 Disabilities and learning difficulties

Book Three

3.1 Women’s rights

3.2 Violence against women

3.4 LGBT+ rights

4.1 Racism in education and at work

4.2 Racism in society

Online and media

Pupils should know

  • their rights, responsibilities and opportunities online, including that the same expectations of behaviour apply in all contexts, including online.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

9.1 Personal safety online

9.2 Cyberbullying

Book Two

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

5.2 Your online reputation

12.3 Online literacy and responsibility

  • about online risks, including that any material someone provides to another has the potential to be shared online and the difficulty of removing potentially compromising material placed online.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

9.3 Protecting your identity online

Book Two

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

5.2 Your online reputation

12.3 Online literacy and responsibility

  • not to provide material to others that they would not want shared further and not to share personal material which is sent to them.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

Book Two

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

5.2 Your online reputation

12.2 Radicalisation

12.3 Online literacy and responsibility

  • what to do and where to get support to report material or manage issues online.

Book One

9.1 Personal safety online

9.3 Protecting your identity online

Book Two

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

5.2 Your online reputation

12.2 Radicalisation

  • the impact of viewing harmful content.

Book One

9.1 Personal safety online

Book Three

2.2 What influences your attitudes to sexuality and gender?

12.2 Radicalisation

  • that specifically sexually explicit material e.g. pornography presents a distorted picture of sexual behaviours, can damage the way people see themselves in relation to others and negatively affect how they behave towards sexual partners.

Book One

9.1 Personal safety online

Book Three

2.2 What influences your attitudes to sexuality and gender?

9.1 Social media and body image

  • that sharing and viewing indecent images of children (including those created by children) is a criminal offence which carries severe penalties including jail.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

Book Two

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

Book Three

2.2 What influences your attitudes to sexuality and gender?

  • how information and data is generated, collected, shared and used online.

Book One

9.3 Protecting your identity online

Book Three

12.3 Online literacy and responsibility

Being safe

Pupils should know

  • the concepts of, and laws relating to, sexual consent, sexual exploitation, abuse, grooming, coercion, harassment, rape, domestic abuse, forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM, and how these can affect current and future relationships.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

Book Two

3.1 Giving your consent

5.1 Child abuse

5.2 Grooming

Book Three

3.2 Violence against women

3.3 Forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM

  • how people can actively communicate and recognise consent from others, including sexual consent, and how and when consent can be withdrawn (in all contexts, including online).

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

7.2 Sex: your rights and responsibilities

Book Two

3.1 Giving your consent

Intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health

Pupils should know

  • how to recognise the characteristics and positive aspects of healthy one-to-one intimate relationships, which include mutual respect, consent, loyalty, trust, shared interests and outlook, sex and friendship.

Book One

3.2 The laws of attraction

5.2 What makes a good friend?

Book Two

2.1 Close relationships

2.2 What makes a healthy relationship?

2.3 Unhealthy relationships and feelings of rejection

Book Three

8.1 Different types of partnership

8.2 What makes relationships work?

  • that all aspects of health can be affected by choices they make in sex and relationships, positively or negatively, e.g. physical, emotional, mental, sexual and reproductive health and wellbeing.

Book One

3.2 The laws of attraction

6.3 Safer sex: contraception

7.1 Exploring your sexuality

7.2 Sex: your rights and responsibilities

Book Two

4.1 STIs

4.2 Symptoms of STIs

4.3 Sexual health clinics

Book Three

7.1 Pregnancy

  • the facts about reproductive health, including fertility and the potential impact of lifestyle on fertility for men and women, and menopause.

Book One

2.2 Periods: the facts

Book Two

4.1 STIs

4.2 Symptoms of STIs

Book Three

7.1 Pregnancy

  • that there are a range of strategies for identifying and managing sexual pressure, including understanding peer pressure, resisting pressure and not pressurising others.

Book Two

3.1 Giving your consent

3.2 Am I ready to have sex?

3.3 Having sex – teenagers’ experiences

  • that they have a choice to delay sex or to enjoy intimacy without sex.

Book Two

3.1 Giving your consent

3.2 Am I ready to have sex?

3.3 Having sex – teenagers’ experiences

  • the facts about the full range of contraceptive choices, efficacy and options available.

Book One

6.1 Sex: facts and myths

6.3 Safer sex: contraception

Book Two

4.3 Sexual health clinics

Book Three

7.1 Pregnancy

  • the facts around pregnancy including miscarriage.

Book Three

7.1 Pregnancy

  • that there are choices in relation to pregnancy (with medically and legally accurate, impartial information on all options, including keeping the baby, adoption, abortion and where to get further help).

Book Three

7.1 Pregnancy

7.2 What to do if you are pregnant

7.3 Teenage parents

7.4 Good parenting

  • how the different sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDs, are transmitted, how risk can be reduced through safer sex (including through condom use) and the importance of and facts about testing.

Book One

6.3 Safer sex: contraception

Book Two

4.1 STIs

4.2 Symptoms of STIs

4.3 Sexual health clinics

  • about the prevalence of some STIs, the impact they can have on those who contract them and key facts about treatment.

Book Two

4.1 STIs

4.2 Symptoms of STIs

4.3 Sexual health clinics

  • how the use of alcohol and drugs can lead to risky sexual behaviour.

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

7.2 Sex: your rights and responsibilities

Book Two

3.1 Giving your consent

8.2 Alcohol: the risks

Book Three

5.1 Safety at parties

  • how to get further advice, including how and where to access confidential sexual and reproductive health advice and treatment.

Book Two

4.3 Sexual health clinics

7.1 Pregnancy

7.2 What to do if you are pregnant

Additional

The Law in relation to

  • marriage

  • consent, including the age of consent

  • violence against women and girls

  • online behaviours including image and information sharing (including ‘sexting’, youth-produced sexual imagery, nudes, etc.)

  • pornography

  • abortion

  • sexuality

  • gender identity

  • substance misuse

  • violence and exploitation by gangs

  • extremism/radicalisation

  • criminal exploitation (for example, through gang involvement or ‘county lines’ drugs operations)

  • hate crime

  • female genital mutilation (FGM)

Book One

6.2 Sex and the law

12.1 What are drugs?

12.2 What effects do drugs have?

Book Two

3.1 Giving your consent

5.2 Grooming

5.3 Sexting – it’s no laughing matter

6.1 What is stereotyping?

6.2 What is prejudice?

7.1 Recreational drugs

7.2 New psychoactive substances

7.3 How can I tell if a drug is safe?

Book Three

2.3 Understanding gender identiy

3.2 Violence against women

3.3 Forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM

3.4 LGBT+ rights

4.2 Racism and society

6.1 Heroin and cocaine

6.2 The impact of drugs

7.2 What to do if you are pregnant

11.2 Gangs and knife crimes

12.2 Radicalisation

  • Schools should address the physical and emotional damage caused by female genital mutilation (FGM). They should also be taught where to find support and that it is a criminal offence to perform or assist in the performance of FGM or fail to protect a person for whom you are responsible from FGM. As well as addressing this in the context of the law, pupils may also need support to recognise when relationships (including family relationships) are unhealthy or abusive (including the unacceptability of neglect, emotional, sexual and physical abuse and violence, including honour-based violence and forced marriage)

Book Two

2.3 Unhealthy relationships and feelings of rejection

5.1 Child abuse

5.2 Grooming

Book Three

3.2 Violence against women

3.3 Forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM

  • Internet safety should also be addressed. Pupils should be taught the rules and principles for keeping safe online. This will include how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how and to whom to report issues. Pupils should have a strong understanding of how data is generated, collected, shared and used online, for example, how personal data is captured on social media or understanding the way that businesses may exploit the data available to them.

Book One

9.1 Personal safety online

9.2 Cyberbullying

9.3 Protecting your identity online

Book Three

12.3 Online literacy and responsibility

 

 

 

KS4 & 5

PSHE:

 

  • Personal Action Planning

  • Drugs Education

  • Sex and Relationship Education

  • Personal Finance 

  • Emotional Wellbeing

  • Healthy Lifestyles

  • Making Informed Career Choices

  • Applying for Jobs and Courses

  • Relationships, Behaviour and Practices in the Workplace

  • Personal Safety (physical, emotional, and online)

  • Being a Critical Consumer

  • Introduction to Diversity, Prejudice and Discrimination

 

Citizenship and Community (taught within PSHE and E & E)

Teaching should build on the key stage 3 programme of study to deepen pupils’ understanding of democracy, government and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. Pupils should develop their skills to be able to use a range of research strategies, weigh up evidence, make persuasive arguments and substantiate their conclusions. They should experience and evaluate different ways that citizens can act together to solve problems and contribute to society.

Pupils should be taught about:

 

  • parliamentary democracy and the key elements of the constitution of the United Kingdom, including the power of government, the role of citizens and Parliament in holding those in power to account, and the different roles of the executive, legislature and judiciary and a free press

  • the different electoral systems used in and beyond the United Kingdom and actions citizens can take in democratic and electoral processes to influence decisions locally, nationally, and beyond

  • other systems and forms of government, both democratic and non-democratic, beyond the United Kingdom Citizenship

  • local, regional, and international governance and the United Kingdom’s relations with the rest of Europe, the Commonwealth, the United Nations and the wider world

  • human rights and international law

  • the legal system in the UK, different sources of law and how the law helps society deal with complex problems

  • diverse national, regional, religious, and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding

  • the different ways in which a citizen can contribute to the improvement of his or her community, to include the opportunity to participate actively in community volunteering, as well as other forms of responsible activity

  • income and expenditure, credit and debt, insurance, savings and pensions, financial products and services, and how public money is raised and spent.

 

Coverage of the curriculum KS4 & 5 PSHE

 

 

Lesson title 

Learning objectives 

Curriculum objectives 

Unit 1 You and your life 

Lesson 1: Knowing ourselves 

  • To understand the concept of emotional intelligence 

  • To learn how to become more self-aware  

  • To recognise emotions in ourselves and others  

Mental wellbeing (HE) 

  • how to talk about their emotions accurately and sensitively, using appropriate vocabulary  

  • how to recognise the early signs of mental wellbeing concerns  

  • how to critically evaluate when something they do or are involved in has a positive or negative effect on their own or others' mental health 

Lesson 2: Families 

  • To learn about what makes a healthy family and how dynamics change over time  

  • To understand when a relationship in a family might be unsafe or unhealthy and how to seek advice and support for yourself or others 

Families (RSE) 

  • that there are different types of committed, stable relationships 

  • how these relationships might contribute to human happiness and their importance for bringing up children 

  • the roles and responsibilities of parents with respect to raising  
    of children, including the characteristics of successful parenting 

  • how to: determine whether other children, adults or sources of information are trustworthy; judge when a family, friend, intimate or other relationship is unsafe (and to recognise in others’ relationships); and, how to seek help or advice, including reporting concerns about others, if needed. 

 

 

Unit 2: You and your relationships 

Lesson 1: Respecting others 

  • To consider the importance of respect 

  • To understand how respect can be shown 

  • To learn to recognise disrespectful habits or behaviours and how to change them  

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • the characteristics of positive and healthy friendships (in all contexts, including online) including: trust, respect, honesty, kindness, generosity, boundaries, privacy, consent and the management of conflict, reconciliation and ending relationships. This includes different (non-sexual) types of relationship. 

  • practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships 

  • that some types of behaviour within relationships are criminal, including violent behaviour and coercive control 

Being safe (RSE) 

  • the concepts of, and laws relating to, sexual consent, sexual exploitation, abuse, grooming, coercion, harassment, rape, domestic abuse, forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM, and how these can affect current and future relationships 

  • how people can actively communicate and recognise consent from others, including sexual consent, and how and when consent can be withdrawn (in all contexts, including online) 

Lesson 2: Healthy relationships and dating  

  • To understand that there are different types of intimate, consensual relationships 

  • To understand the realities of romantic relationships 

  • To consider how to use online dating apps or social media sites safely  

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • the characteristics of positive and healthy friendships (in all contexts, including online) including: trust, respect, honesty, kindness, generosity, boundaries, privacy, consent and the management of conflict, reconciliation and ending relationships. This includes different (non-sexual) types of relationship. 

  • practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships 

Intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health (RSE) 

  • how to recognise the characteristics and positive aspects of healthy one-to-one intimate relationships, which include mutual respect, consent, loyalty, trust, shared interests and outlook,  
    sex and friendship 

Being safe (RSE) 

  • how people can actively communicate and recognise consent from others, including sexual consent, and how and when consent can be withdrawn (in all contexts, including online) 

Lesson 3: Unhealthy relationships 

  • To recognise the ‘red flags’ in a relationship online or offline 

  • To understand what domestic abuse is and what help is available 

  • To spot the signs of sexual exploitation and grooming 

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • that some types of behaviour within relationships are criminal, including violent behaviour and coercive control 

  • what constitutes sexual harrassment and sexual violence and why these are always unacceptable 

Unit 3: You and society 

Lesson 1: Equality 

 

  • To understand what equality is 

  • To learn about the nine protected characteristics                                        

  • To understand discrimination and stereotyping 

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • how stereotypes, in particular stereotypes based on sex, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation or disability, can cause damage (e.g. how they might normalise non-consensual behaviour or encourage prejudice) 

  • that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including people in positions of authority and due tolerance of other people's beliefs 

  • the legal rights and responsibilities regarding equality (particularly with reference to the protected characteristics as defined in the Equality Act 2010) and that everyone is unique and equal. 

Lesson 2:  
Social injustice 

 

  • To understand what social injustice means 

  • To learn about unconscious bias                                    

  • To learn about the Black Lives Matter movement 

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • how stereotypes, in particular stereotypes based on sex, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation or disability, can cause damage (e.g. how they might normalise non-consensual behaviour or encourage prejudice) 

  • that in school or wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including people in positions of authority and due tolerance of other people's beliefs 

Unit 4: You and your values 

Lesson 1:  
Voting systems and elections 

  • To understand the voting process 

  • To understand how we elect an MP at a general election. 

  • To understand different voting systems 

No relevant objectives 

Lesson 2: Pressure groups 

  • To understand what a pressure group is 

  • To understand the four different types of pressure group 

  • To understand what a new social movement is 

No relevant objectives 

Unit 5: You and your future 

Lesson 1:  
You and your career 

  • To learn what a career is 

  • To understand how skills, interests and knowledge contribute to careers 

Learning skills (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L3. how their strengths, interests, skills and qualities are changing and how these relate to future career choices 

Choices and pathways (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)    

  • L6. about the information, advice and guidance available to them on next steps and careers; how to access appropriate support and opportunities employability  

Work and career (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)    

  • L10. to develop their career identity, including values in relation to work, and how to maximise their chances when applying for education or employment opportunities  

Lesson 2: 
You and your options 

  • To understand the differences between the options available after 16 for education and training for students in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland 

Choices and pathways (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)    

  • L4. about the range of opportunities available to them for career progression, including in education, training and employment   

  • L6. about the information, advice and guidance available to them on next steps and careers; how to access appropriate support and opportunities 

Lesson 3:  
You, work and  technology 

  • To learn how labour markets have changed over the last 100 years and how they may change in the future 

  • To look at the effects of automation and AI 

  • To examine how the manufacturing sector is declining and the service sector is growing 

Choices and pathways (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)    

  • L5. about the need to challenge stereotypes about particular career pathways, maintain high aspirations for their future and embrace new opportunities  

Work and career (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)   

  • L7. about the labour market, local, national and international employment opportunities   

  • L8. about employment sectors and types, and changing patterns of employment  

Lesson 4:  
You and your workplace skills 

  • To identify acceptable and unacceptable behaviour at work 

  • To distinguish between workplace bullying and harassment, with examples 

Learning skills (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L1. to evaluate and further develop their study and employability skills   

Work and career (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)   

  • L7. about the labour market, local, national and international employment opportunities  

  • L9. to research, secure and take full advantage of any opportunities for work experience that are available  

Employment rights and responsibilities (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L13. the skills and attributes to manage rights and responsibilities at work including health and safety procedures   

  • L15. about the unacceptability and illegality of discrimination and harassment in the workplace, and how to challenge it 

Unit 6: Your healthy body 

Lesson 1: Keeping physically healthy 

  • To understand the different elements required to keep ourselves physically fit and healthy 

  • To understand the importance of personal hygiene and self-examination 

Physical health and fitness (HE) 

  • the positive associations between physical activity and promotion of mental wellbeing, including as an approach to combat stress 

  • the characteristics and evidence of what constitutes a healthy lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight, including the links between an inactive lifestyle and ill health, including cancer  
    and cardiovascular ill-health 

Healthy eating (HE) 

  • how to maintain healthy eating and the links between a poor diet and health risks, including tooth decay and cancer 

Health and prevention (HE) 

  • (late secondary) the benefits of regular self-examination and screening 

  • the importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and how a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn 

Lesson 2:  
Your selfimage 

  • To consider what is a healthy and unhealthy selfimage 

  • To evaluate our own selfimage and where we can go for help 

  • To consider the concept of a ‘perfect’ body 

Internet safety and harms (HE) 

  • the similarities and differences between the online world and the physical world, including: the impact of unhealthy or obsessive comparison with others online (including through setting unrealistic expectations for body image) 

Changing adolescent body (HE) 

  • the main changes which take place in males and females,  
    and the implications for emotional and physical health 

Lesson 3: First aid 

  • To learn basic life support first aid skills 

Basic first aid (HE) 

  • life-saving skills […] 

Unit 7: Your healthy mind 

Lesson 1: Mental health  

  • To understand what mental health is 

  • To learn how to recognise the early signs of mental health concerns  

  • To know what to do to help ourselves and others 

Mental wellbeing (HE) 

  • that happiness is linked to being connected to others 

  • how to recognise the early signs of mental wellbeing concerns 

  • how to critically evaluate when something they do or are involved in has a positive or negative effect on their own or others’ mental health 

  • the benefits and importance of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation and voluntary and service-based activities on mental wellbeing and happiness 

Lesson 2: Exam stress 

  • To understand stress and how to deal with it 

  • To consider a range of different studying techniques 

  • To learn some simple mindfulness and meditation techniques 

Mental wellbeing (HE) 

  • how to talk about their emotions accurately and sensitively, using appropriate vocabulary 

  • that happiness is linked to being connected to others 

  • how to critically evaluate when something they do or are involved in has a positive or negative effect on their own or others’ mental health 

  • the benefits and importance of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation and voluntary and service-based activities on mental wellbeing and happiness 

Physical health and fitness (HE) 

  • the positive associations between physical activity and promotion of mental wellbeing, including as an approach to combat stress 

Unit 8: You and your money 

Lesson 1: Getting paid 

  • To understand that there are different types of job contract  

  • To understand payslips 

  • To know what income tax and National Insurance are, and the difference between net and gross pay 

Financial choices (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L21. to evaluate the financial advantages, disadvantages and risks of different models of contractual terms, including self-employment full-time, part-time and zero-hours contracts 

Lesson 2: Becoming financially independent 

  • To distinguish between the short run and the long run, and between variable and fixed costs 

  • To understand what fraud and phishing are and to discuss the best fraud prevention measures 

  • To plan a budget for independent financial living 

Financial choices (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L16. how to effectively budget, including the benefits of saving  

  • L17. how to effectively make financial decisions, including recognising the opportunities and challenges involved in taking financial risks 

  • L18. to recognise and manage the range of influences on their financial decisions 

Unit 9: Sexual relationships 

Lesson 1: Sex and relationship responsibilities  

  • To be able to explain the laws around sex  

  • To learn about LGBTQI+ rights  

  • To explore the characteristics and qualities needed for healthy intimate relationships  

Being safe (RSE) 

  • the concepts of, and laws relating to, sexual consent, sexual exploitation, abuse, grooming, coercion, harassment, rape, domestic abuse, forced marriage, honour-based violence and FGM, and how these can affect current and future relationships 

Intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health (RSE) 

  • how to recognise the characteristics and positive aspects of healthy one-to-one intimate relationships, which include mutual respect, consent, loyalty, trust, shared interests and outlook,  
    sex and friendship 

  • how to get further advice, including how and where to access confidential sexual and reproductive health advice and treatment 

Lesson 2: Keeping sexually healthy 

  • To learn which contraception methods prevent STIs 

  • To learn about the full range of contraception available and show their understanding 

  • To begin to make responsible choices for their ongoing sexual health 

Intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health (RSE) 

  • the facts about the full range of contraceptive choices, efficacy and options available 

  • how the different sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS, are transmitted, how risk can be reduced through safer sex (including through condom use) and the importance  
    of and facts about testing 

  • how to get further advice, including how and where to access confidential sexual and reproductive health advice and treatment 

Changing adolescent body (HE) 

  • key facts about [...] menstrual wellbeing 

Lesson 3: Understanding fertility, infertility and different routes to parenthood 

  • To understand the terms fertility, infertility and miscarriage 

  • To understand the different options for starting a family             

  • To learn where to get reproductive health advice and treatment 

Intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health (RSE) 

  • the facts about reproductive health, including fertility, and the potential impact of lifestyle on fertility for men and women and menopause 

  • the facts around pregnancy including miscarriage 

  • how to get further advice, including how and where to access confidential sexual and reproductive health advice and treatment 

Unit 10: Sexually explicit content online 

Lesson 1: Sexual content online 

  • To know what indecent content online is and what the laws around these are for young people 

  • To know where to report anything indecent online 

  • To understand the laws around youth produced sexual imagery  

Internet safety and harms (HE) 

  • how to identify harmful behaviours online (including bullying, abuse or harassment) and how to report, or find support, if  
    they have been affected by those behaviours 

Online and media (RSE) 

  • about online risks, including that any material someone provides to another has the potential to be shared online and the difficulty of removing potentially compromising material placed online 

  • that sharing and viewing indecent images of children (including those created by children) is a criminal offence which carries severe penalties including jail 

  • what to do and where to get support to report material or manage issues online 

Lesson 2: Pornography 

  • To understand the laws around pornography 

  • To learn about the impacts and dangers of viewing pornography 

Online and media (RSE) 

  • the impact of viewing harmful content 

  • that specifically sexually explicit material, e.g. pornography presents a distorted picture of sexual behaviours, can damage the way people see themselves in relation to others and negatively affect how they behave towards sexual partners 

  • that sharing and viewing indecent images of children (including those created by children) is a criminal offence which carries severe penalties including jail 

Internet safety and harms (HE) 

  • how to identify harmful behaviours online (including bullying, abuse or harassment) and how to report, or find support, if  
    they have been affected by those behaviours 

Unit 11: Sexuality and gender identity 

Lesson 1: Gender 

  • To understand the difference between sex, gender and gender identity  

  • To learn what intersex means 

  • To consider how gender stereotypes affect us all 

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • how stereotypes, in particular stereotypes based on sex, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation or disability, can cause damage (e.g. how they might normalise non-consensual behaviour or encourage prejudice). 

  • that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including people in positions of authority and due tolerance of other people's beliefs 

  • the legal rights and responsibilities regarding equality (particularly with reference to the protected characteristics as defined in the Equality Act 2010) and that everyone is unique and equal. 

Lesson 2: Sexuality  

  • To understand what sexuality is 

  • To learn about different sexual identities 

  • To consider how a young person can prepare to come out safely when they feel ready 

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • how stereotypes, in particular stereotypes based on sex, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation or disability, can cause damage (e.g. how they might normalise non-consensual behaviour or encourage prejudice) 

  • that in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including people in positions of authority, and due tolerance of people's beliefs the legal rights and responsibilities regarding equality (particularly with reference to the protected characteristics as defined in the Equality Act 2010) and that everyone is unique and equal. 

Unit 12: You and your choices 

Lesson 1:  
Addiction 

  • To understand why people might take drugs and drink alcohol  

  • To understand the wider impacts of taking drugs 

  • To learn about addictions and recovery 

Drugs, alcohol and tobacco (HE) 

  • the facts about legal and illegal drugs and their associated risks, including the link between drug use, and the associated risks, including the link to the serious mental health conditions 

  • the physical and psychological risks associated with alcohol consumption and what constitutes low risk alcohol consumption in adulthood 

  • the physical and psychological consequences of addiction, including alcohol dependency 

  • awareness of the dangers of drugs which are prescribed but still present serious health risks 

Lesson 2:  
Alcohol, drugs, tobacco and the law 

  • To learn about the laws around smoking tobacco 

  • To learn about the laws around alcohol 

  • To learn about the laws around illegal drugs 

Drugs, alcohol and tobacco (HE) 

  • the law relating to the supply and possession of illegal substances 

  • the physical and psychological consequences of addiction, including alcohol dependency 

  • the facts about the harms from smoking tobacco (particularly the link to lung cancer), the benefits of quitting and how to access support to do so. 

Lesson 3:  
Illegal drugs and crime 

  • To learn that drug-taking can be linked to criminal activities 

  • To learn to recognise the signs of criminal exploitation 

Drugs, alcohol and tobacco (HE) 

  • the law relating to the supply and possession of illegal substances 

  • the physical and psychological consequences of addiction, including alcohol dependency 

Social influences (PSHE Association Relationships) 

  • R37. to recognise situations where they are being adversely influenced, or are at risk, due to being part of a particular group or gang; strategies to access appropriate help 

  • R38. factors which contribute to young people becoming involved in serious organised crime, including cybercrime  

Unit 13: You online 

Lesson 1: Our online lives 

  • To understand what your digital footprint is 

  • To understand the right to privacy and its limits 

  • To know what the right to be forgotten is 

Internet safety and harms (HE) 

  • the similarities and differences between the online world and the physical world, including: [...] how advertising and information is targeted at them and how to be a discerning consumer of information online 

Online and media (RSE) 

  • their rights, responsibilities and opportunities online, including that the same expectations of behaviour apply in all contexts, including online 

  • what to do and where to get support to report material or manage issues online 

  • the impact of viewing harmful content 

  • how information and data is generated, collected, shared and used online 

  • not to provide material to others that they would not want shared further and not to share personal material which is sent to them 

Media literacy and digital resilience (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)  

  • L12. strategies to manage their online presence and its impact on career opportunities  

Lesson 2: Online bullying 

  • To understand what online bullying is 

  • To understand the laws on online bullying 

  • To consider the effects of online bullying 

Respectful relationships, including friendships (RSE) 

  • about different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders to report bullying and how and where to get help 

Online and media (RSE) 

  • their rights, responsibilities and opportunities online, including that the same expectations of behaviour apply in all contexts, including online 

  • not to provide material to others that they would not want shared further and not to share personal material which is sent to them 

Internet safety and harms (HE) 

  • how to identify harmful behaviours online (including bullying, abuse or harassment) and how to report, or find support, if  
    they have been affected by those behaviours 

Unit 14: You as a consumer 

Lesson 1: Consumer rights, advice and awareness 

  • To understand what a nudge is and why shops use it 

  • To know what consumers’ rights are, and to be aware of the main three rights 

  • To understand how goods can be returned and in what condition and circumstances 

No relevant objectives 

Lesson 2: Advertising, data and consumer ethics 

  • To think about the different ways organisations collect digital data  

  • To understand what GDPR  
    is and how it limits the collection and use of data within the UK 

Online and media (RSE) 

  • how information and data is generated, collected, shared and used online. 

Financial choices (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World)   

  • L20. the skills to challenge or seek support for financial exploitation in different contexts including online  

Media literacy and digital resilience (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L22. that there are positive and safe ways to create and share content online and the opportunities this offers    

  • L23. strategies for protecting and enhancing their personal and professional reputation online   

  • L24. that social media may disproportionately feature exaggerated or inaccurate information about situations, or extreme viewpoints; to recognise why and how this may influence opinions and perceptions of people and events   

  • L25. how personal data is generated, collected and shared, including by individuals, and the consequences of this  

Unit 15: You and the future of our planet 

Lesson 1: You and the environment 

  • To understand what an ecosystem is 

  • To understand what biodiversity is 

  • To know what ecologism is and examine the difference between shallow and deep ecologists 

No relevant objectives 

Lesson 2: Power and pollution 

  • To distinguish between the different types of pollution 

  • To examine the relative merits of nuclear power and renewable energy 

  • To look at the work of Extinction Rebellion 

No relevant objectives 

Unit 16: Fake news and disinformation 

Lesson 1: Fake news 

  • To define what fake news is 

  • To discuss whether social media companies should be responsible for the content they publish 

  • To identify common flaws in critical thinking 

Media literacy and digital resilience (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L27. strategies to critically assess bias, reliability and accuracy in digital content 

  • L29. to recognise the shared responsibility to challenge extreme viewpoints that incite violence or hate and ways to respond to anything that causes anxiety or concern 

Lesson 2: The news agenda, censorship and free speech 

  • To understand what bias is 

  • To understand how the news agenda is shaped  

  • To understand what censorship is and discuss when it is and is not appropriate 

No relevant objectives 

 

Lesson title 

Learning objectives 

Curriculum objectives 

Unit 17: You and the law 

Lesson 1: How laws affect your life 

  • To understand the different ages at which different laws apply to children in the UK 

  • To understand what the age of criminal responsibility is in the UK 

  • To understand what a youth court is and where you can get legal advice in the UK 

No relevant objectives 

Lesson 2: You and the police 

  • To understand the age of criminality 

  • To understand what a police caution is and an ABSO are 

  • To understand how a youth detention centre is an alternative to prison for those aged 17 or below 

No relevant objectives 

Unit 18: You and the world 

Lesson 1: Local, regional and national government 

  • To understand the three main types of local council 

  • To examine devolution and regional government in the UK 

  • To understand the role of the civil service 

No relevant objectives 

Lesson 2: International organisations 

  • To recognise that international organisations have a profound influence on many areas of our lives 

  • To learn about the aims, objectives and membership of four international organisations 

No relevant objectives 

Unit 19: You and the global economy 

Lesson 1: You and economic issues 

  • To distinguish between a free market, a mixed economy and a command economy 

  • To understand what economic growth is 

  • To examine other ways of measuring economic progress 

No relevant objectives 

Lesson 2: The World Trade Organization 

  • To understand what trade is 

  • To learn about the WTO, its role and objectives 

  • To evaluate whether free trade is good or bad in the UK 

No relevant objectives 

Unit 20: Reflecting on your choices 

Lesson 1: Reflection and feedback 

  • To understand how reflection helps us to improve 

  • To recall three positive experiences and identify what these memories have in common 

  • To understand how to give feedback effectively 

Learning skills (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L2. to evaluate their own personal strengths and areas for development and use this to inform goal setting  

Lesson 2: Your choices 

  • To learn how to balance breathing 

  • To learn how to set SMART targets 

  • To learn how to set PURE targets 

Learning skills (PSHE Association Living in the Wider World) 

  • L2. to evaluate their own personal strengths and areas for development and use this to inform goal setting  

    

 

 

 

 Enterprise and Employability KS4 & 5

 

Enterprise capability Students must know and understand different definitions of enterprise capability applicable to business contexts (making and selling) social contexts (non-profit focused interaction of individuals or groups) environmental contexts, eg recycling schemes. Enterprise capability should be understood as the ability to handle uncertainty and respond positively to change, to create and implement new ideas and ways of doing things, to make reasonable risk/reward assessments and act upon them in one’s personal and working life. Students must also understand that enterprise capability is supported by financial capability defined as the ability to manage one’s own finances and to become questioning and informed customers of financial services. Students must also be able to make informed choices in business, social and environmental contexts to make the most of available resources.

The enterprise process Students must know, understand and be able to apply the four stages of the enterprise process.

 

These are: -

Stage 1: identification and description of the problem/need/opportunity and the generation of ideas on how to address it

Stage 2: plan the enterprise project or activity

Stage 3: implementation of the enterprise project or activity

Stage 4: evaluation of the enterprise project or activity.

 

Stage 1: Identification and description of a problem/need/opportunity and the generation of ideas on how to address it. Students must be able to know how to generate ideas on how to tackle different problems and/or meet different needs in business and social contexts. Some of these problems may have more than one focus and students should understand the interrelationships of the key aspects. Students must understand the principles and applications of a range of methods, including brainstorming and lateral thinking that are used to develop the range of ideas. They must also understand that each idea should be logically evaluated to determine the likelihood of success. Students must understand the concept of mind mapping and how it can be used to show links between ideas and how this can then be used to develop an effective enterprise plan. Students must know and understand the role of research methods, including the use of ICT and the World Wide Web in developing ideas. Students must also understand the role of individuals and groups as both sources of support when developing enterprise ideas, and for sounding out the diversity of opinions relevant to those ideas. Students should be aware that this leads to a greater range and improved quality of ideas which are more suited to meet the demands of the task.

 

Stage 2: Plan the enterprise project or activity Students must be able to construct and fully explain, reason, and justify the following points where applicable. How to: plan an enterprise effectively using financial capability and economic/business understanding break down tasks into achievable goals in order to increase the likelihood of success plan for an organised and creative use of resources including time, materials, equipment and technology evaluate the skills of individuals and use these to deploy team members when developing an enterprise. Thus, each team member becomes responsible for achieving specific tasks, which enables them to develop individual skills and attributes and also increases the chances of success of the enterprise. This is within an organisational structure that must be developed and agreed evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of team members and use this evaluation to allocate appropriate roles to increase the chances of success set appropriate timescales and milestones apply SMART targets, SWOT analyses and PEST analyses (political, economic, social and technological) identify target audiences and present the enterprise idea appropriately cost the plan to include: sources of finance calculation of costs, revenues and financial viability in terms of fixed, variable and total costs and price, total revenue and profit if appropriate set the budget to include: income, expenditure and profit a cash flow forecast conduct a suitable risk assessment (in the context of both success/failure and health and safety) before starting an enterprise activity set appropriate achievable criteria related to the goals of the enterprise project or activity use appropriate advertising and branding develop a marketing implementation strategy to include where appropriate: methods of primary and secondary market research qualitative and quantitative research size and types of sampling (random, quota and stratified) interview techniques incorporating an awareness of interviewer bias market analysis (to include scale of demand and target audience) opportunity cost analysis take appropriate legal, regulatory and ethical aspects into account including: copyright, patents and trademarks health and safety the Equality Act 2010 ethical aspects of the enterprise, e.g. sustainability, fair trade, corporate and social responsibility.

 

Stage 3: Implementation of the enterprise project or activity Students must know and understand that: for enterprise activities to be successful they must be carried out efficiently, effectively, lawfully and with due regard to health and safety plans rarely remain unchanged when being implemented and that during an enterprise project or activity the following may need monitoring and amending where appropriate: plans deadlines cash flow profit and loss SMART targets any amendments made need to be described and the reasons for them explained decision-making should be flexible, responsive and timely perseverance and a can-do attitude are necessary for successfully establishing and developing enterprise projects or activities running over an extended period of time many personal employability skills and attributes are needed and will be developed when driving enterprise projects or activities.

Stage 4: Evaluation of the enterprise project or activity Students are required to know how to evaluate the effectiveness of an enterprise project or activity. Students must be able to: review activities undertaken review final outcomes against achievement criteria reflect on lessons learnt during the process make reasoned suggestions for improvement assess skills (transferable and non-transferable) and attributes developed and acquired, and how they might enhance employability.

 

Coverage of the curriculum KS4 & 5 Employability

 

Mandatory units 

Understanding Mindset (J/506/7234) 

Optional units 

Understanding Your Customers (J/502/3590 ) 

Understanding Motivation (L/502/3591 ) 

Dealing with Your First Days at Work (R/502/3589 ) 

Business and Customer Awareness (T/502/3584 ) 

Setting Yourself Targets (H/502/3595 ) 

Managing Your Time (K/502/3596 ) 

Handling Information at Work (M/502/3597 ) 

How to Keep Improving (R/502/3592 ) 

Presenting Information (Y/502/3593 ) 

Developing Assertiveness (H/506/8777) 

Introduction to Independence (K/506/8778) 

Problem Solving at Work (A/502/3585 ) 

Creative Thinking (A/502/3599 ) 

Coping with Change (T/502/3598 ) 

Taking Part in a Project (K/502/3601 ) 

ICT for Employment (M/502/3602 ) 

Identifying Processes and Procedures at Work (A/502/3604 ) 

Following Instructions (F/502/3605 ) 

Understanding Personal Finance (J/502/3606 ) 

Tackling Number Problems (R/502/3608 ) 

Working in a Team (F/502/3586 ) 

Working With Colleagues (L/502/3610 ) 

Being Managed by Others (Y/502/3612 ) 

Using Social Media in the Workplace (F/506/7233) 

Using Online Collaborative Workplace Tools (L/506/7235) 

Using Telephones in the Workplace (L/506/8790) 

Understanding Conflict at Work (Y/502/3609 ) 

Meetings in the Workplace (Y/506/8789) 

Job and Training Search Skills (D/502/3613 ) 

Job Application Skills (H/502/3614 ) 

Interview Skills (K/502/3615 ) 

Writing a CV (J/502/3038) 

Being Safe and Healthy at Work (M/502/3616 ) 

Health and Well-Being in the Workplace (T/506/8783) 

Disclosing an Offence (M/508/0897) 

Working with Colleagues (A/502/3571) 

ICT for Employment (D/502/3563) 

Job Search Skills (D/502/3577) 

Dealing with Your First Days at Work (J/502/3539) 

Following Instructions (K/502/3565) 

How to Keep Improving (R/502/3544) 

Working in the Community as a Volunteer (J/506/9100) 

 

 

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural development Across the Curriculum

 

In PSHE, spiritual, moral, social and cultural topics are raised. Likewise, through CCC, Enterprise and Employability. However, it is the expectation that SMSC is embedded across the whole school curriculum and follows the definition of SMSC from the Ofsted School inspection handbook November 2019:

 

The spiritual development of students is shown by their:

 

  • ability to be reflective about their own beliefs (religious or otherwise) and perspective on life

  • knowledge of, and respect for, different people’s faiths, feelings and values

  • sense of enjoyment and fascination in learning about themselves, others and the world around them

  • use of imagination and creativity in their learning

  • willingness to reflect on their experiences

 

At Roselyn House School and The RHISE Service, outcomes of spiritual development are seen in students’ improving knowledge of the central beliefs, ideas and practices of major world religions and philosophies. They begin to cultivate an understanding of how people have sought to explain the universe through various myths and stories, including religious, historical and scientific interpretations. Students are introduced to beliefs which are held socially. They are encouraged to increase their ability to give some account of these and to derive values from them. Through doing so our students demonstrate behaviour and attitudes which derive from such knowledge and understanding and from social conviction, and which show awareness of the relationship between belief and action. They begin to give a social response to questions about the purpose of life, and to the experiences of e.g. beauty and love or pain and suffering.

 

Cross Curricular elements may include:

Art – the study of artists and their spiritual and cultural domains

English – including a wide range of literature, including stories, poetry and plays and debate

Outdoor Education and visits – the beauty of nature.

 

 

The moral development of students is shown by their:

  • ability to recognise the difference between right and wrong and to readily apply this understanding in their own lives, recognise legal boundaries and, in doing, respect the civil and criminal law of England

  • understanding of the consequences of their behaviour and actions

  • interest in investigating and offering reasoned views about moral and ethical issues and ability to understand and appreciate the viewpoints of others on these issues

We will demonstrate moral development by our students gaining knowledge of the language and ideas of morality. They will look at local, national and world issues such as the individual and the community, rights, duties and responsibilities, war and peace, human rights, exploitation and aid, medical issues, environmental issues and equal opportunities. They will be encouraged to act and behave in accordance with such values, including the skills of making moral decisions and forming moral judgements. They will take part in moral discussions, with the desire to persuade, combined with respect for and listening to, others’ viewpoints whilst understanding the value of doing so.  Our students will be encouraged to understand the consequences of their and others’  behaviour and actions and develop the ability to recognise the difference between right and wrong and readily apply this understanding to their own lives, and in doing so, respect the civil and criminal law of England. Social values will be modelled in relation to interpersonal skills and relationships with others and be expected to develop tolerance; respect for persons and property including truthfulness, compassion, co-cooperativeness, sensitivity, love and empathy. In doing so students will look at improving their self with reference to such aspects as: self-awareness, self-confidence, self-esteem, self-control, self-reliance, self-respect, self-discipline and responsibility.

 

 

 

Cross curricular elements may include:

English/Drama/CCC – whereby students may explore such concepts as conflict, tension, love and hate.

Science – including the ways in which scientific discovery and technological development might cause moral problems and dilemmas e.g. genetics, pollution, atomic power, greenhouse effect, conservation, organic farming, fertilizers etc

SEAL/ Adulthood Pathway- developing and recognising aspects of self in order to progress and learn strategies to manage self for the future in society.

 

 

The social development of students is shown by their:

  • use of a range of social skills in different contexts, for example working and socialising with other pupils, including those from different religions, ethnic and socio- economic backgrounds

  • willingness to participate in a variety of communities and social settings, including by volunteering, cooperating well with others and being able to resolve conflicts effectively

  • acceptance and engagement with the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs; they develop and demonstrate skills and attitudes that will allow them to participate fully in and contribute positively to life in modern Britain.

 

Students are encouraged consistently to improve their social development and will be introduced to the ways in which society functions and are organised, from the family to the school and thence to wider groupings (local, national, international). As a result of this they will develop a wider understanding of how individuals relate to each other and to the institutions, structures and processes of society, and of how what is learnt in the curriculum relates to life in society. This will increase the value of what is learnt and their attitudes and reasoning behind it. Students will be offered strategies to encourage their capacity to adjust to a range of social contexts by appropriate and sensitive behaviour. They will be introduced to new skills which may include taking on, as appropriate, the roles of leader and team worker, exercising responsibility initiative and co-operation. They will be introduced to activities which will lead to working and socialising with students from different religions, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. Opportunities will be provided for students to participate in a variety of communities and social settings e.g. volunteering, cooperating with others and being able to resolve conflicts effectively. Skills such as the ability to make a strong social contribution to the well-being of social groups and to form effective relationships with them will be introduced. Students at Roselyn House School and the RHISE Service will be expected to develop acceptance and engage with the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of people with different faiths and beliefs. They will continue to develop skills and attitudes that will allow them to participate fully in and contribute positively to life in modern Britain.

 

Cross curricular elements may include:

 

PE and Outdoor Education – including the need for rules and the need to abide by them. Working in groups can promote learning how to share, acknowledgment of the members of the group and their skill and role within the group.

Mathematics – including how numerical and mathematical ideas can be used as a means of communication, Also the need for numerical competency as a survival skill. English/Drama/Speaking and Listening – including role play, whereby students can explore their own beliefs and feelings and their relationship with others.

 

 

The cultural development of students is shown by their:

 

  • understanding and appreciation of the wide range of cultural influences that have shaped their own heritage and that of others

  • understanding and appreciation of the range of different cultures in the school and further afield as an essential element of their preparation for life in modern Britain

  • ability to recognise, and value, the things we share in common across cultural, religious, ethnic and socio- economic communities

  • knowledge of Britain’s democratic parliamentary system and its central role in shaping our history and values, and in continuing to develop Britain

  • willingness to participate in and respond positively to artistic, musical, sporting and cultural opportunities

  • interest in exploring, improving understanding of and showing respect for different faiths and cultural diversity and the extent to which they understand, accept and respect diversity. This is shown by their respect and attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio- economic groups in the local, national and global communities

 

 

Roselyn House School and The RHISE Centre will encourage cultural development by providing our students with the knowledge of the nature and roots of their own cultural traditions and practices, be these religious, social, aesthetic, ethnic, or political, and also of the key features of other major cultural groups within their own society. They will gain knowledge of Britain’s democratic parliamentary system and its central role in shaping our history and valued in continuing to develop Britain. They will be provided with the opportunity to participate in and respond positively to artistic, sporting and cultural opportunities. Opportunities will be provided to further develop understanding of the diversity of religious, social, ethnic and political traditions and practices both nationally and internationally in order to facilitate an essential element of the preparation for life in modern Britain. They will experience a social response and accomplishment in a range of cultural fields. These will include literature, both prose and verse, music, technology, including information technology, art and design, and physical movement, including dance and sport. Students will develop a capacity to relate what they learn, in school generally and in particular areas of the curriculum, to their appreciation of wider cultural aspects of society, and to evaluate the quality and worth of cultural achievements. They will be encouraged to develop an interest in exploring, improving understanding of and showing respect for different faiths and cultural diversity, and the extent to which they understand, respect, accept and celebrate diversity, as shown in their tolerance and attitudes towards different religious, ethnic and socio-economic groups in the local, national and global communities

 

Cross curricular elements may include:

Visits to museums, exhibitions, theatre which encourage an appreciation of culture.

Art and Design – including development of creative and aesthetic skills, experience of different two dimensional and three-dimensional media, appreciation of artistic culture, the impact of graphical design on the 20th Century, appreciation of works of art judged to be outstanding from different times and places.

Information Technology – including the impact that the information revolution and technological explosion have had in the 20th Century culture e.g. on communication, language, leisure, business, employment, the home, health and medical care and disability.

Creative Mindfulness – Including art and creativity from a variety of cultures and countries, links with different community groups and projects and exploration of thoughts and feelings linked to SEAL/ Tutor Time/ Mentor Sessions

 

 

 

Reviewed by S.Damerall, K.Holmes and J.Birkenhead  May 2021

Reviewed: June 2022